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The International Center on Nonviolent Conflict Resource Library

View in full at International Center on Nonviolent Conflict

A range of resources on civil resistance, in many languages

The International Center on Nonviolent Conflict has the aim to create ‘the most accessible online library on civil resistance’. Here you can find 60 pages of searchable resources, most of them available to read online/download – and translated into 50+ languages.

Excerpt from ‘Can Civil Resistance Work Against Corporations?’:

“First, durable campaigns are more effective than one-off protests. They are also more effective against larger corporations that are undergoing leadership change, suggesting that civil society groups select corporate targets possessing these attributes. Second, civil society groups seeking concessions from corporations are likely to face higher barriers to success against firms active in highly competitive markets on which the state is highly dependent. Labor-intensive sectors are more vulnerable than capital-intensive sectors. Working to improve adherence to the rule of law may ultimately make corporate concessions more likely in the long run. This suggests that activists and civil society groups would do well to evaluate the political and economic contexts in which they (and their target firms) operate to better assess the probability that such challenges will ultimately yield change. Our research has even broader implications for the societies in which these campaigns take place. In many developing countries, where violent civil conflict is often a possibility or a reality, small-scale victories of grassroots mobilization may have important demonstration effects throughout the society. In fact, research on other types of people power movements has shown that civil resistance is preferable to many other forms of mobilization because countries emerging from mass civil resistance campaigns are 15 percent less likely to relapse into civil war that campaigns emerging from armed conflict. Moreover, countries in which civilians have waged nonviolent struggle are much more likely to usher in democratic institutions through a “democracy-from-below” mechanism.”


The International Center on Nonviolent Conflict Resource Library
View in full at International Center on Nonviolent Conflict